Pattern Drafting

Custom pattern drafting is a process of creating design templates, in which craft items and clothing are sewn. The patterns are usually made of pieces of paper that are being trace on the fabric and then cut. Each drafted pattern will serve as the individual part for the item or garment that will be made and sewn. Custom pattern drafting is made with the details given as the basis of the pattern that will be made.

This can be either . . .

Measuring the Bed

Measuring the Bed-1

Measure accurately to make a comforter and dust ruffle that fits the bed perfectly.

Comforters reach 3″ to 4″ (7.5 to 10 cm) below the mattress line. They have a drop length (the distance from the upper edge of the mattress to the bottomofthe comforter) of 9″ to 12″ (23 to 30.5 em), depending on the depth of the mattress. Determine the drop length by measuring from the top of the mattress to the top of the box spring, then adding to that figure the amount of overlap desired. Take into account fabric stiffness which may cause the comforter to stand away from the side of the bed.

To determine finished comforter size, measure from side to side across the top of the mattress for width, and from the head to the foot of the bed for length. Add the desired drop length to the length of the bed, and twice the drop length to the width of the bed for finished measurements.

Batting for comforters is available in standard widths for. beds of standard sizes; select the proper size for your comforter.

For the finished dust ruffle length, measure from the top of the box spring to the floor; for the deck, measure the width and length of the box spring.

Pillow sizes are 20″ x 26″ (51 x 66 cm) standard; 20″ x 30″ (51 x 76 em) queen; and 20″ x 40″ (51 x 102 em) king. Pillow puffiness varies, however, so make the best-fitting shams by measuring the width and length of the pillow with a tape measure across the center of the pillow. Ruffled shams made from lightweight fabrics will droop around the edges if they are cut too large.

{Credit} Singer sewing for the Home (copyright 1984-1988)

Half Sizes – Women’s and Misses

sizes womens misses-2The differences between the half size and regular size figure is mainly in the height, the half size figure measuring 5 feet 4” or less, and the regular size, 5 feet 6” to 8”.

There is also a difference in the measurements around bust, waist and hip, the half size figure measuring about 2” to “ more than the regular size: that is, comparing size 14-1/2 with 1-4; 16-1/2 with 16, etc.

Garments designed especially for shorter women [trade term is half sizes] are made about 3” to 4” shorter than the garments for the regular sizes; that is, about 1” shorter in the waist and sleeve; 2” to 3” shorter in the skirt length. Not all styles that are designed for the regular size figures are suitable for shorter women; therefore the half size garment must be appropriate in design as well as perfectly proportioned for the shorter figure.

The body measurements listed below have been compiled in accordance with those used in the ready-to-wear trade.
The measurements on page 10 & 11 for half sizes include the necessary ease allowance around bust and waistline for the bodice pattern, and around arm and elbow for the sleeve pattern.

body-measurement-chart1 sizes womens misses-1

Cowl neck Front

cowl neck front – 3 styles
The diagrams below show how to allow fullness in
front for single, double, or triple drape cowl neck,
using the dress front [dart less or front dart] foundation as a guide.

COWL NECK WITH SINGLE DRAPE
Illustration shows blouse with high neckline drape in front.
Neckline is 1” lower at shoulder.
1) Using the dart less front foundation,
draw a straight line from a point on shoulder seam, 1” below neckline, to center front neck.
Mark position for drape allowance by drawing a curved line from shoulder to neck, and making
section A about 1” wide at deepest part of curve.
2) First draw squared lines; then slash front between sections A and B, and spread placing front along
the squared line as illustrated. Trace front to waistline only.
3) This diagram shows completed front. Allow seams on all edges but center front.

COWL NECK WITH DOUBLE DRAPE
Illustration shows blouse with neckline 1” lower at shoulder, and 4” lower at center front.
1) Use the regular hip-length dress foundation as a guide.
Draw a straight line from shoulder to center front for lower neck. Mark positions for drape allowance as shown by dotted lines
2) Draw squared lines; then slash front between sections A, B and C, and spread placing front along the squared line as illustrated. Trace front to waistline only.
3) For best results, front with cowl neck should be cut on the bias of material.

 

cowl neck front-1 cowl neck front-2 cowl neck front-3

Draft of the Bra Pattern

Bra Pattern Style 1-C-CUP 1 and 2 Using the dress foundation to waist line only, close up the side dart in front; then reduce width of front at side seam by dotted lines in diagram 2. 3) Reduce width of back at side seam; then draft bra front and back as shown by dotted lines. Shift side seam, 1-1/2” forward, and mark sections . . .

Selecting an Overlock Sewing Machine

Overlock-sewing-_machines_imageOverlock sewing machines will trim, stitch and overcast seams as they sew, and they sew faster than conventional sewing machines, up to 1,500 stitches per minute. Because of these features, an overlock can save time and give a professional appearance to items constructed.
The overlock machine can be used to sew a wide variety of items–from placemats and napkins to sportswear and draperies. Sewing items, such as a T-shirt or jogging outfit, can be done in minutes and the seams of the finished products will look like those in ready-to-wear. The overlock can also be used to finish the edges of seams, which will be sewn with a conventional machine. Decorative effects can be achieved by using special threads in the loopers. Threads, such as metallics, silks and perle cotton, can be used to sew seams or to finish garment edges. For special effects, fine knitting yarn, buttonhole twist, crochet thread and even narrow ribbon can be used.

Overlock sewing machines are specialized, but they do not replace the conventional sewing machine. Overlocks form interlocking stitches using one or two needles and one or two loopers. The overlock stitch is more like crochet or knitting than the stitch of a conventional machine. Loopers replace the traditional bobbin and interlock threads together.
Seam edges are trimmed by blades located just in front of the needle(s). In some models, the upper knife can be rotated up to disengage the cutting action. In other models, one blade must be removed when trimming is not desired.

Selecting An Overlock Machine

 

The type of overlock machine used will determine the kind of sewing techniques that can be done.

Overlock-sewing-_machines-stichA two-thread model is best for finishing seam edges. It can also be used to stitch flatlock seams. A flatlock seam is usually sewn with the wrong sides of the fabric together. The seam is then pulled so the seam allowances slip and lie flat inside the stitching. This seam is useful when seaming sweatshirts, jogging suits and other active wear made from sportswear fleece and velour. It can be used to stitch elastic and lace to lingerie. Hems can also be sewn using some two-thread overlock machines.
A three-thread overlock trims, stitches and overcasts seams in one operation. Overlock-sewing-_machines_stitchThe three thread overlock seam is most useful when sewing knits. It can be used to sew woven fabrics, but not in areas that will receive a lot of stress. The three-thread can also be used to sew pin tucks, make narrow rolled hems and to finish fabric edges. Decorative stitches are possible using a variety of threads or yarns, such as crochet yarn, perle cotton, buttonhole twist, lightweight knitting yarn, narrow ribbon or metallic thread. Some three-thread models can be converted to do two-thread stitching.
Overlock-sewing-_machines-fpor-threadThe four-thread overlock will stitch a chain stitch or a safety stitch as it stitches and overcasts seams. The chain stitch model is most useful when seaming woven fabrics. The safety stitch model can be used to sew woven or knitted fabrics. By using one needle and one looper, the four-thread model is easily converted to do two-thread stitching. Some four-thread overlock machines convert to do three-thread stitching.

Where To Use Overlock Stitching

Two-Thread Overlock Stitch • Used for finishing seam edges when seams are to be sewn using a conventional machine. • Used to create the flatlock seam in loosely fitting active sportswear, in knits and some trendy fashions in woven fabrics. • Should be avoided in areas that will receive stress.

Three-Thread Overlock Stitch

• Suitable for sewing woven and knitted fabrics, but should be avoided in areas of stress. • Can be used when sewing most shirts, blouses, skirts, dresses, lingerie and swimwear. • Areas of stress to avoid include crotch seam of pants and sleeve seams of shirts or blouses.

 

Four-Thread Overlock with Safety Stitch

• Used for same projects as the three-thread overlock stitch, but can be used in areas that receive stress.

• Suitable for sewing blouses, shirts, skirts, dresses, pants, lingerie, action wear, swimwear and sleepwear in knitted or woven fabrics.

Four-Thread Overlock and Chain Stitch

 

Suitable when sewing woven fabrics, even in areas of stress.

• Stitch does not stretch so should not be used in knitted garment when stretch is required   in seams.

• Used when sewing shirts, blouses, skirts, pants, sleepwear and draperies.

• Use chain stitch when fitting garments, since stitches are easily removed.

Basic Features of Overlock Machines

 

There are a number of features to consider carefully when selecting an overlock machine. The major concern for prospective owners is the threading process. Check to be certain the machine has a coded threading system–colors, symbols or numbers may be used. The thread stand should have adaptors for the use of cones or spools of thread. Check the use and care manual for threading instructions.

The loopers are the most difficult parts to thread. A special threading tool and a pair of tweezers are usually provided. The lower looper is usually threaded before the upper looper.

Overlock-sewing-_machines-lower-looper

The tension dials may be marked with numbers to indicate degree of tension, but some machines use + or – signs. The tension system differs from machine to machine. On some machines, tension dials are sensitive, requiring only a slight turn to adjust the flow of thread. On others, dials must be rotated several times before the thread tension is affected.
Overlock-sewing-_machines-tension-dials

The presser foot of an overlock machine is much larger than that of a conventional machine. The pressure on most models can be adjusted to the weight of fabric being sewn. Because the foot is so long, there is seldom a problem of fabrics feeding unevenly as they are sewn. Check the position of the presser foot lifter on the machine. On some models, it is on the right side of the machine near the handwheel.

Overlock-sewing-_machines-stitch-former

The throat plate or presser foot will have a special stitch former not found on a conventional machine. On some machines, this former can be adjusted to change the stitch width. On others, the throat plate or presser foot must be changed when a different stitch width is desired. Stitch widths range from less than 1 mm to greater than 5 mm.

Overlock-sewing-_machines_stitch-former

The stitch length adjustment procedure varies from machine to machine. Some offer a stitch adjustment dial on the front of the machine. Others require adjustments to be made inside the machine. Determine how easily this adjustment can be made for regular seams or rolled edges. A power switch that turns the machine on and off should be present. This switch may or may not be connected to a light. A built-in light should be included, if possible. Although the cutting knives are made to last for many hours of sewing, it is important to determine how easy they are to change. One blade will need to be replaced more often than the other; it is the least expensive of the two blades.

Overlock-sewing-_machines-upper-knife-blade

On some machines, the knife position can be adjusted to vary the seam allowance width. Some knives can be disengaged so trimming does not occur. Needles for overlock machines may be special or conventional in design. Determine what type is required and be certain they are readily available. Be sure to select the correct size for the fabric type being sewn, whether using a special or conventional needle.

Overlock-sewing-_machines-needles

A variety of threads can be used on the overlock machine. Standard threads can be used for sewing regular seams. There also are threads especially designed for these machines. The overlock uses much more thread than a conventional machine, so plan ahead. Cone thread– more than 1,000 yards per cone–is usually less expensive than regular sewing thread. A lowtwist nylon thread that allows seams to stretch is also available.

Overlock-sewing-_machines-threads

Special Features To Check

 

Some machines have a variety of presser feet to help the sewer with special needs. Feet are available for sewing a rolled hem and for applying elastic, cording and stay tape to seams. Blind hemmer feet may be available. The rolled hem may also require a special throat plate. Take note of which come with the machine and which must be purchased as extras. Other features to look for include an accessory or tool kit, a dust cover, a carrying handle, a built-in accessory storage compartment and a scrap catcher. Some machines have a base that can be adjusted to create a free arm for sewing.

Trying Out an Overlock

As you investigate the machines, try several brands and models. Thread each several times. Use the tweezers and needle threader provided, if necessary. Change threads by tying an overhand knot to determine if tension dials must be adjusted to allow the knotted threads to flow through easily.

Notice how easy the machine is to start and stop stitching; some handwheels turn counterclockwise, others rotate clockwise. Is it easy to raise and lower the presser foot? Does the light illuminate the sewing area sufficiently? Is the instruction manual well-illustrated and easy to read? Change the throat plate and needle(s) to determine how easily this can be done, and adjust the stitch length and width. Use a variety of thread types to determine how the tension is adjusted. Sew at slow, medium and fast speeds to learn how easy the machine is to control and to determine if it walks.

Some machines have suction cups on the bottom to hold them in place. Check to see how easy it is to sew without trimming the seam edge while the blades are in place. Then, disengage the blades to determine how it is done. Use a variety of fabric weights and types when trying an overlock. Sew through single thicknesses and two or more layers of fabric. Adjust the presser foot pressure to make matching plaids or stripes a simple process. Check the amount of stretch in the seams you sew.

Finally, before you buy a machine, check the warranty and dealer services available. What does the warranty cover and for how long? Who makes good on the warranty, the manufacturer or the dealer? Does the dealer offer new owner lessons? Will special classes be available to you after you have learned to use it? Does the dealer have a complete and consistent supply of the parts and accessories you will need? Consider the machine’s price in light of all the above factors. Take plenty of time to make a decision that will provide the best performance and true satisfaction. Sometimes it is smarter to pay a little more, especially when good service and peace of mind are involved.

Care of the Machine

After making your selection, you will want to keep the machine in good operating condition. Keep it free of lint and stray fabric scraps. Use the brush provided to brush away lint from the inside of the machine.

Blow briskly on areas that tend to collect a lot of lint; a special product–canned air–is available for this purpose or use your vacuum or hair dryer. Oil the areas recommended by the use and care manual. Use oil especially designed for machines. Avoid over oiling. Change the machine needle if it appears to be dull or bent. Either factor can cause skipped stitches. Change the knife blade(s) as soon as the seam edges begin to look ragged.

Orginally written by Susan Wright, Extension

Clothing Specialist.

Cooperative Extension Service- College of Agriculture and

Home Economics

Wide-leg jeans are back for spring

Skinny Is Out

Wide-leg jeans are back for spring.

Wide-leg jeans are back for springPosted by Kristin Larson Tuesday, August 24, 2010 6:11:08 AM

While retail forecasters predict that jeggings will perform well for fall, come spring, it’s all about wide-leg jeans

From skinny to wide—just like that. I say this: Hallelujah.

The ’70s-style bell-bottoms and and the universally flattering boot-cut styles are projected to replace the tight jeans for spring, according to a Reuters story.

“The pendulum is swinging away from skinny,” said Ryan Dziadul, a spokesman for VF Corp.’s 7 For All Mankind brand, in the Reuters story. “There are millions of pairs out there. For spring, it’s about bell-bottoms.”

This is very good news for fuller-figured women (translation: most women). Although the truth is, I never did banish my boot-cut and wide-leg jeans from my wardrobe, even during the skinny-jean reign.

Like you readers, I think everyone should wear what flatters their figure, not dress according to what’s hot in fashion.

 

Read full story on MSN

How to Sew and Tie your Pointe shoe Ribbons

how-to-sew-and-Tie-your-pointe-shoe-ribbonsAlways be sure to sew your ribbons securely. They will not only help to keep your shoe on your foot, but will also support your ankle while on pointe. You can choose to also sew elastic from the back of the heel across your ankle if you wish. Use a strong thread or dental floss to sew the ribbons and elastic.

Cut the ribbon into 4 equal lengths of about 22 to 24 inches.

To see where you should attach the ribbons,fold the heel over the inside shank, toward the sole. Where the edge of the heel meets the drawstring casing is where the end of the ribbon should go. (See right.) Mark this place on each side on the inside of the shoe with a pencil.

Sew the ribbon to the shoe using overhand stitches along the top near the drawstring. Then continue around all four sides so the pattern resembles a box. Try to only sew through the canvas lining of the shoe so that your stitches do not show through the satin exterior. Be careful not to sew through the drawstring.

Repeat with the other three ribbons.

If you are using elastics: before cutting the elastic, put your shoe on, and measure the elastic across your ankle so it’s comfortable. It should be snug, but not too tight. Sew the ends about a 1/2-inch from the heel seam.

breaking in your shoes

How you break in your shoes will become a matter of personal preference as you get used to what you need in your pointe work. Most dancers like to flatten the box slightly and also soften the shank (the sole of the shoe) slightly by bending it by hand gently, about two inches from the end of the heel. Do not over-bend it as you don’t want it to break when you stand on point.

You may also want to soften the sides by the joints of your toes, so that you can stand on “half-pointe” on your way to full pointe. While you have the shoes on your

feet, drip a small amount (a capful is enough) of rubbing alcohol—which you can

get at the drugstore—on the sides, by your big toe and little toe joints.

how-to-sew-and-Tie-your-pointe-shoe-ribbons_1how to tie your ribbons

The first time you tie your ribbons, you may find that you need to trim the ends. Do this only once you’ve decided which shoe you prefer for the right foot and which for the left. Once the ribbons are cut, the shoes will have a “left” and “right.”

With the shoe on, wrap one ribbon across the top of your instep and then around your ankle.

Keeping the first ribbon snug and flat, wrap the other ribbon in the other direction across the top of your instep and around your ankle.

Make sure that the ribbons aren’t pulled too tight,but are tight enough so that they’ll hold the shoe on firmly. They should also not wind too high or too low up your ankle, but sit just above the ankle bone.

Bring the ends of the ribbons together on the inside of your ankle and tie them into a small knot. Be careful not to tie the knot over your Achilles tendon on the back of your ankle.

Once you’ve decided which shoe will be most comfortable as the right shoe, and which as the left, you should trim the ribbons. Trim the ends  (it’s usually best to cut them on a diagonal) so that there is about two inches beyond the knot.

Once the ribbons are trimmed, fold them down neatly and tuck the ends under the rest of the ribbon so that they can’t be seen.

When dancers perform in pointe shoes, they often sew their ribbons down so that the ends don’t pop out while they’re dancing.

Always be sure to sew your ribbons securely. They will not only help to keep your

shoe on your foot, but will also support your ankle while on pointe. You can choose to also sew elastic from the back of the heel across your ankle if you wish. Use a strong thread or dental floss to sew the ribbons and elastic.

how-to-sew-and-Tie-your-pointe-shoe-ribbons_2Cut the ribbon into 4 equal lengths of about 22 to 24 inches.

To see where you should attach the ribbons,fold the heel over the inside shank, toward the sole. Where the edge of the heel meets the drawstring casing is where the end of the ribbon should go. (See right.) Mark this place on each side on the inside of the shoe with a pencil.

Sew the ribbon to the shoe using overhand stitches along the top near the drawstring. Then continue around all four sides so the pattern resembles a box. Try to only sew through the canvas lining of the shoe so that your stitches do not show through the satin exterior. Be careful not to sew through the drawstring.

Repeat with the other three ribbons.

If you are using elastics: before cutting the elastic, put your shoe on, and measure the elastic across your ankle so it’s comfortable. It should be snug, but not too tight. Sew the ends about a 1/2-inch from the heel seam.

breaking in your shoes

How you break in your shoes will become a matter of personal preference as you

get used to what you need in your pointe work. Most dancers like to flatten the box slightly and also soften the shank (the sole of the shoe) slightly by bending it by hand gently, about two inches from the end of the heel. Do not over-bend it as you don’t want it to break when you stand on pointe.

You may also want to soften the sides by the joints of your toes, so that you can stand on “half-pointe” on your way to full pointe. While you have the shoes on your feet, drip a small amount (a capful is enough) of rubbing alcohol—which you can get at the drugstore—on the sides, by your big toe and little toe joints.

how to tie your ribbons

The first time you tie your ribbons, you may find that you need to trim the ends. Do this only once you’ve decided which shoe you prefer for the right foot and which for the left. Once the ribbons are cut, the shoes will have a “left” and “right.” With the shoe on, wrap one ribbon across the top of your instep and then around your ankle.

Keeping the first ribbon snug and flat, wrap the other ribbon in the other direction across the top of your instep and around your ankle.

Make sure that the ribbons aren’t pulled too tight,but are tight enough so that they’ll hold the shoe on firmly. They should also not wind too high or too low up your ankle, but sit just above the ankle bone.

Bring the ends of the ribbons together on the inside of your ankle and tie them into a small knot. Be careful not to tie the knot over your Achilles tendon on the back of your ankle.

Once you’ve decided which shoe will be most comfortable as the right shoe, and which as the left, you should trim the ribbons. Trim the ends  (it’s usually best to cut them on a diagonal) so that there is about two inches beyond the knot.

Once the ribbons are trimmed, fold them down neatly and tuck the ends under the rest of the ribbon so that they can’t be seen.

When dancers perform in pointe shoes, they often sew their ribbons down so that the ends don’t pop out while they’re dancing.

 

Back to Fashion Articles

 

Fashionable hats for summer

Fashionable-hats-for-summerSummer is the time when every woman wants to show how beautiful and fashionable she is. Not only clothes take part in forming the style. Accessories are also very important; no style can be complete without a trendy necklace, bracelets or other little details. As far as during this season of the year you have to cover your head for you may get sunstroke. A hat or a bonnet may become a perfect accessory to fulfill your style and express character.

The latest trend these days is a hat made of straws. What you must have in your wardrobe is a black straw hat with wide edges and a rounded vertex girded with a band. This kind of hat is definitely the most fashionable this summer. Although black is very popular, you may choose any other dark color that would fit better with your clothes. If you’re planning a trip to the beach where women commonly wear light dresses, pick a white hat and you’ll look perfect.

Another fashionable way to cover your head is a cap. Of course you have to pick them very carefully and it definitely goes with sporty style or jeans. Men should pick washed pigment-dyed caps. You don’t have to buy a new one and make it look as if it was used for 10 years, you’ll undoubtedly find those in any fashionable shop. While men are into “dirty” style, women are suggested caps with flowers. A bright colored cap will surely make you look trendy and add charm to your appearance.

It’s a must for a real lady to have a bonnet. It’s very hard to define what is on top, because top is originality. Large bonnets of any color decorated with flowers and bands are always trendy; however, you may find something very different and look amazing. Bonnets are not for everyday use. Original bonnet will make you noticeable and complete your style better than any other accessory.

Article from Jurgina.com – Read more…

 

 

Fashion Forward

Published: Monday | January 4, 2010


Latoya Grindley, Jamaica Gleaner Writer

FLleft_1_P5D4KiceyCoutuAMMixed-colour dresses have certainly made their way into the New Year. We are sure you stocked up on pieces like this empire waist tri-colour combination, so shine in it for the new year! – Ian Allen/Photographer

It is a new year, and as many would say, “new year, new things”. But that is not the case as it relates to fashion. That’s a definite NO! At least not for now. For some time now, we have noticed the longevity of some fashion trends, with these overlapping into different seasons.

Have you ever had an outfit that you absolutely loved, but wouldn’t wear because it was no longer in style even though you hadn’t worn it more than three times? Well, if you went crazy shopping last year, or bought a few trend-guided pieces, perhaps you will be granted some leeway to wear them a bit longer into the new year.

 

 

FLleft_1_PLA3TsJaWardroAM

Based on Flair‘s observation of the trends, there are many ‘spill-over’ trends this
So even though you didn’t buy yesterday, but more like last year, flaunt your favourites while they are still trendy. While flaunting them, you can still keep abreast of the upcoming trends and perhaps treat yourself to a piece or two.year, which simply means you don’t have to spend unnecessarily to replenish your wardrobe; at least not for a while. And this is definitely something the fashionistas who are deeply in tune with the trends love to hear, especially in these times.

 

 

 

 

 

 

FLleft_1_PM22BDeGapM200IK

Here are some of the fashionable trends that have made their way into fashion 2010.

latoya.grindley@gleanerjm.com

Off-the-shoulder designs have been with us for most of last year and for this year, and are going nowhere fast, at least not for now. It is simply sophisticated and feminine and can be featured on dresses and tops. – File

Maxi dresses are fun and flirty, and many women fell in love with the easy-to-wear garb last year, which can be dressed up or down. However, for this year, instead of playing it safe with solid colours, put a spin on maxis by opting for floral prints. – Colin Hamilton/Freelance Photographer

 

 

 

FLleft_1_PFIHGAbsintheFAM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FLleft_1_PJEIMJeweleryJAM

Adding instant pizzazz to your outfit, bold and chunky jewellry (necklaces, rings, earrings, bracelets) paved their way into people’s hearts last year and they will certainly remain this year. – File

 

 

 

 

 

 

FLleft_1_PXH5CMacoI2009AMBe bold and bright in the fashionable trend of neon colours which has spilled over into this year. You will be amazed what a little colour will do for you and your image. – File.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FLleft_1_PPM33JapanConcAMNo more ‘plain-Jane shoes’ as there was an obvious adornment of shoes, especially in last season. Fringes, zips, bows, feathers, jewels and other embellishments were a hit on sandals and shoes and we just can’t get enough of them. So pull them out of storage and step forward into 2010. – Winston Sill/Freelance Photographer

 

Leopard prints have been with us for many seasons and for those who just can’t have enough of these, they are still a hit. – File